*Peer-Reviewed Articles

  • Wu, Charles Chong-Han. 2017. Understanding the Structures and Contents of National Interests-An Analysis of Structural Equation Modeling, Korean Journal of International Relations, vol.15, no.3, p327-356 (journal article)

    • Scholars of international relations have consistently applied a single indicator to represent states' interests. However, the concept of interests will be illusive if we consider using only one single variable. The author proposes and estimates a hierarchically organized states’ interests structure in which specific interests are derived from abstract value. These objectives in turn are assumed to be constrained by a core value about states' vital interest in international society. Applying confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) by LISREL, the empirical results suggest that specific interests can be structured with three major objectives that describe the general direction the government should take in international affairs: security, economic, and community interests. These measures provide better theoretical and empirical representations for what we understand about states' interests in world politics.


  •  Wu, Charles Chong-Han. 2016. Common Interests and Two-Level Game Theory in the South China Sea Dispute, American Journal of Chinese Studies, vol.23, p145-158 (journal article)
    • Previous studies already demonstrate that interest indicators from realists demonstrate significant results between interstate conflict and states’ interests. By investigating cross-Strait relations, this paper suggests that the deepening of both political and economic interests boosts the political will to implement peaceful talks for the China-Taiwan dyad. However, the exchange of opinions and cooperation based on the common interests did not provide the cross-Strait relations any further stability during Ma’s second presidency. In contrast, the social split and contesting politics in Taiwan slowed down the cooperation between Beijing and Taipei. Since international and domestic politics affect each other, we need to apply Robert Putnam’s two-level game theory to investigate if there are any interactions between the power and preferences of the major actors at their domestic level, especially on domestic constituents’ preferences. The author uses the 2014 Sun Flower Movement in Taiwan and the South China Sea issue to illustrate the importance of aggregation of states’ interests between Beijing and Taipei, and argues that the maintenance of status-quo on the South China Sea issue may provide more stability to the cross-Strait relations.

  •  Wu, Charles Chong-Han. 2016. Taiwan's Hedging Strategy against China-The Strategic Implications of Ma Ying-Jeou's Mainland Policy. Asian Survey, vol. 56, no.3 , p.466-487 (SSCI journal article)

    • This article addresses the identifiable conditions for hedging strategies. By examining specific cases of policy choices and political situations in a triangular framework, the author suggests that Taiwan’s hedging behavior against China is sensitive to local variation in power capabilities, economic intention, and the security commitment from the United States. 

  • Wu, Charles Chong-Han. 2016. Alliance Commitment and the Maintenance of the Status-Quo. Asian Perspective, vol.40, no.2, p.197-221 (SSCI journal article) (data) (with John Fuh-Sheng Hsieh)
    • This study shows that alliance commitment is the key to the maintenance of the status quo between a weak challenger and a major power attacker. In order to verify our theory, we employ relative data from Benson’s typology of compellent military alliances (Benson, 2011, 2012) and conduct empirical tests for our theoretical hypothesis. The statistical results comply with the theory, indicating that a trustful and strong military commitment creates negative effects on the status quo. We examine the cases of the Korean War and the U.S.-China-Taiwan relations to buttress our arguments. The latter case also shows the need to modify our original model under certain conditions.
  •  Wu, Charles Chong-Han. 2014. Interest Similarity and Cross-Strait Peace. Fudan Journal of Humanities and Social Sciences, vol.7, no.3, p.451-470 (journal article)
    • Studies in this article support the peace-building effects of interest similarity, and we have to re-evaluate the current world peace through a new lens of interest.  Previous research has informed us that states with similar security and/or economic interests will experience fewer conflict onsets. This study begins with research treating interest similarity as a “facilitating condition for conflict,” and argues that not only security interest, but also capitalist economic policies that lead to the deeper integration of an economy into international markets should be considered one of the ultimate driving forces of peace. By discussing a brief description of bilateral peace in the China-Taiwan dyad, this article concludes that the China-Taiwan dyad has less possibility of encountering military conflict if both governments can maintain similarity in their security interests. Moreover, the author distinguishes different models in the capitalist peace theory, which include the free-market and the social-market. Accordingly, this article examines three different prestigious capitalist models: trade, capital openness, and contract-intensive economy as social-market theory. The results suggest that the China-Taiwan case is an appropriate case for the trade (Weede 1996) and capital openness models (Gartzke 2007). Future studies need to be more aware of the model chosen for capitalist peace on cross-Strait relations. 
  • Wu, Charles Chong-Han. 2012. The Strategic Triangle: U.S-China-Taiwan Relations. Sharnoff's Global Views, December, 2012 (on-line journal article)
    • When it comes to the U.S.-China-Taiwan relations, the initial assertion tells us that without the U.S. backing, declaration of de jure independence is simply not a feasible option for Taiwan. But the complicating factor is that the U.S. not only has an interest in the security of Taiwan but also in stable relations with China, particularly after the growing ties between the U.S. and China in almost all areas over the years. Thus, the maintenance of the status quo turns out to be the U.S. policy, too. To achieve such a goal, the U.S. has adopted strategic ambiguity as the cornerstone of its policy toward the cross-Strait relations for the past few decades.

*Peer-Reviewed Books and Book Chapters 

  • Wu, Charles Chong-Han. 2014. Seeking Common Ground While Keeping Differences: The Strategic Analysis of the Cross-Strait Relations. Baltimore, MD: University of Maryland School of Law, Maryland Series in Contemporary Asian Studies. (book) 
    • By applying the theoretical arguments on the studies of cross-Strait relations, I suggest that deepening both security and economic similarity boosts the political will to implement peace agreements for the China-Taiwan dyad. Obstacles in the establishment of a comprehensive cross-Strait dialogue include the increasing Taiwanese identity, and China’s unwillingness towards democratization. However, two critical principles, notably security and economic issues, provide useful solutions for opening up dialogue.
  • Wu, Charles Chong-Han. 2017. The Comparison between Democratic Peace Theory and Interest Peace Theory. in Tang Chih-Mao ed. The Studies of Peace and Conflicts: Theoretical and Empirical Analysis, Taipei: Wu-Nan Corp. (book chapter in Chinese) 
 
 

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